Research: People who take gym selfies have major mental illnesses!

Do you know someone who “always” trains!

Through a number of extensive research, it has now been found that the people behind the annoying and usually many exaggerated fitness selfies have major mental disorders. “This allows us now instead of irritating ourselves over statuses with sweaty bodies chasing likes, rather should wish these good improvements in the comments and treat them cautiously”says The Nordic Leader’s researcher on psychopathic behavior Preben Drenge at the Danish Institute of Mental Disorders.

Concerned with anerkjenelse
The report by the highly acclaimed research team points out that repeated fitness selfies are a sign that you are constantly chasing recognition. “Themost common diagnosis on these fitness-selfies people is narcissist” says the researcher. Narcissism is a mental disorder that dictates that one is morbidly concerned with himself and his. A typical sign of this disease is to take pictures of yourself in a desperate attempt for others to understand how great you are.

Look how good I am: Most people have friends who post pictures like this daily. Now it turns out that these individuals have great psychiatric challenges.

Annoying and sad
We know that 94% of people who see these fitness selfies annoy themselves over the “clever fitness junkie” says the researcher. “Exaggerated workout selfies are also the main reason people wean each other off on Facebook,”he continues. In other words, one cannot and daily must be presented to people who, due to their mental illness, must pack everyone else a reminder that they are exercising today as well. “In addition to mental disorders, it is also very often people who want contact with the opposite sex” says the researcher. “We see that these people by posting these constant selfies are also desperately looking for girlfriend or new friends”he concludes.

Do you take a lot of selfies that you constantly post on social media? Contact a psychologist then. Get help today!

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